Tuesday, October 22, 2019

Cell Replacement, 3



Cell Replacement, 3

Following are estimated averages for cell replacement in the human body.
Stomach - new every 2-9 days
Lungs - every 2-3 weeks
Colon - every 2-3 days
Skin - in 14 days or less
Red blood cells - every 4 months
Bones – every 10 years
Heart – ongoing
Blood Platelets - every 10 years
Liver - every five months
Joints and cartilage cells - constantly renewing

Because of this, changing to a healthier habit today can have a positive impact on cell replacement in sometimes days.
 advancedbionutritionals@ab.advancedbionutritionals.com

Monday, October 21, 2019

Cell Replacement, 3

This is actually good news because it means that if you create a healthier life style, your cells can becoe healthier, too.

·        Stomach - new every 2-9 days
·        Lungs - every 2-3 weeks.
·        Colon - every 2-3 days.
·        Skin - in as little as 14 days.
·        Red blood cells - every 4 months.
·        Bones – every 10 years
·        Heart - ongoing
·        Blood Platelets - every 10 years
·        Liver - every five  months.
·        Joints and cartilage cells - constantly renewing.

advancedbionutritionals@ab.advancedbionutritionals.com

Cell Replacement, 2


Current wisdom is that neurons are not replaced in the adult human brain with the exception of the hippocampus, the brain’s “search engine,” so to speak. The birth of new neurons has been confirmed in the hippocampus in the adult brain and may continue until the 5th decade of life. The hippocampus is also linked with the creation of new episodic memories.

According to Margaret Reece, PhD, the formation of episodic memory is very complicated and may over-write older memories. Often 
new episodic memories incorporate parts of old memories. For example, if you revisit your old school for a reunion, memory of the reunion will incorporate earlier events from the past when you attended classes at the school.  
https://www.medicalsciencenavigator.com/birth-of-neurons-continues-in-human-brain-into-5th-decade/

Friday, October 18, 2019

Cell Replacement


Is it really true that body organs are replaced regularly?

Most cells in the body are replaced regularly so eventually a body organ, such as the heart, likely has ever cell replaced over time. This is become some die due to age or wear and tear; some reach the end of their life cycle. There are many different estimates, but here are a few:

Taste buds every 10-14 days
New bones every 10 years
New heart every 20 years

Margaret Reese, PhD, estimates that only a few groups of cells in a few body parts last most of your lifetime. They include:
neurons in the cerebral cortex, the inner lens cells of the eye, and muscle cells of the heart. More tomorrow.

Thursday, October 17, 2019

Resting Pupil Size & intelligence, 2


After analyzing data related to three studies, researchers consistently found that baseline pupil size is, in fact, related to cognitive ability. They concluded that the relationship could not be explained by differences in mental effort. According to the study abstract, the effect of working memory capacity and fluid intelligence on pupil size persisted even after 23 sessions and after considering the effect of familiarity versus novelty with the environment. They also considered their findings in the context of the underlying neural mechanisms involved. The researchers took into account potential confounding variables such as: age, ethnicity, and drug substances. Bottom line: fluid intelligence, more so than working memory capacity, is related to baseline pupil size. My brain’s opinion? Bravo to your kid for not only listening but also being willing to share what he heard. Hopefully, the response he received does not slam the door on that type of future parent-child communication.

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Resting Pupil Sign & Intelligence



Okay, this is ridiculous! My kid just came home and said his teacher said there was a correlation between resting pupil size problem-solving intelligence. I told him that was a bunch of crap and not to believe everything he hears. What are teachers teaching these days?”

Thank you for this question. My guess would be that the teacher was passing along recent researched conclusions. Before you are too hard on your kid for being willing to share new information with you, it might help to remember the comment by Wayne Walter Dyer, EdD: The highest form of ignorance is to reject something you know nothing about. There are studies related to resting eye pupil size in relation to fluid intelligence or the ability to solve problems, apply logic, and identify patterns. This in contrast with crystallized intelligence that involves using skills, knowledge. and experience. Three researchers, in a series of three studies, systematically investigated whether pupil size during a passive baseline was associated with individual differences in working memory capacity and fluid intelligence. More tomorrow.

Monday, October 14, 2019

Sadness and Anthropomorphizing


 When I feel sad about something it is very difficult for me to change that, even after I have grieved and “thought” I let go of it. Any suggestions?

A recently published study suggests that anthropomorphizing the sadness may help. What does that mean? When people anthropomorphize, they tend to attribute human characteristics or behavior to someone other than yourself: an animal, and inanimate object, a god . . .  When you talk about a thing or an animal as if it were human, you're anthropomorphizing it. The Easter Bunny is an anthropomorphized rabbit. For example, humans tend to anthropomorphize their pet dogs. Apparently, this works for sadness, as well. Create a mental image of something on which you can transfer some of the sadness and this can help you detach from it. More tomorrow

Friday, October 11, 2019

Air Pollution


This air pollution business is a bit unsettling. Is it really a problem?

The International Energy Agency  estimated that Indoor and outdoor air pollution contribute to the deaths of around 18,000 people per day, worldwide. Air pollution—derived largely from industrial energy production and use—is linked to 6.5 million premature deaths annually. Clean air is needed for good brain-body health. “Yet despite growing recognition of this imperative,“ the Paris-based intergovernmental organization noted, “the problem of air pollution is far from solved in many countries, and the global health impact risks intensifying in the decades to come.”

https://www.the-scientist.com/the-nutshell/global-air-quality-crisis-continues-33301

B. Maher et al., “Magnetite pollution nanoparticles in the human brain,” PNAS, doi:10.1073/pnas.1605941113, 2016.

Thursday, October 10, 2019

Air Pollution and Cognition




If there is a chance that air pollution can negatively impact a fetal brain, what is it doing to children and adults?

According to the World Health Organization, air pollution is bad for one’s health. Period. Estimates are that 4.2 million deaths each year are related to air pollution.

There is a great article in The Scientist you might enjoy. Well, “enjoy” might be a step too far, but it is interestingly informative, from my brain’s opinion.

https://www.the-scientist.com/tag/air-pollution

Wednesday, October 9, 2019

Air Pollution and Fetal Brains



My mother-in-law suggested that we move to a different city because ours has a high amount of air pollution. What could that possibly have to do with my pregnancy?

She may have read an article written by  Chia-Yi Hou and published this month in The Scientist. It describes studies with rodents in which researchers detected abnormal fetal development due, they believe, to air pollution. He cites data from the World Health Organization stating that 4.2 million deaths each year are related to air pollution. There are, of course, steps one can take if one lives in an area of high pollution including air filtration equipment in the home and wearing masks (e.g., N95) when going outdoors..

https://www.the-scientist.com/news-opinion/pregnant-moms-air-pollution-exposure-may-affect-babies-health-66467

Tuesday, October 8, 2019

Brain Parts versus Brain Layers


There are several ways to describe the human brain. Three functional brain layers is one way. Three brain parts is another. 

Some scientists speak about these three parts as:

     1.   The cerebrum (including two hemispheres and the mammalian or 
         limbic section)
     2.   Two cerebellums
     3.   One brain stem

This model lumps the neocortex with its two hemispheres and the mammalian brain into one part, the two cerebellum portions as one part, and the brain stem as one part.

Monday, October 7, 2019

Brain Layers versus Brain Parts


 I’ve heard you talk about three brain layers but recently I read an article that talked about three brain parts. Which is which?

In the early 20th Century, neuroscientist and physician, Paul D. MacLean, proposed the Triune Brain Model in an attempt to help people understand more about how the brain functions. He believed that the human brain was really three brains in one: the neocortex (consisting of two cerebral hemispheres), the limbic system (often referred to as the mammalian brain and consisting of a collection of small brain organs such as the hippocampus and hypothalamus), and the reptilian brain (consisting of the two cerebellums and the brain stem). Nowadays some refer to this model as three functional brain layers. Brain parts tomorrow.


Friday, October 4, 2019

Cell Regeneration--or not


Is it really true that body organs are replaced regularly?

Most cells in the body are replaced regularly so eventually a body organ, such as the heart, likely has every cell replaced over time. Some cells die due to age or wear and tear; some reach the end of their life cycle. There are many different estimates, but here are a few:

Taste buds every 10-14 days
New bones every 10 years
New heart every 20 years

Margaret Reese, PhD, estimates that only a few groups of cells in a few body parts last most of your lifetime. They include neurons in the cerebral cortex; muscle cells of the heart; and the inner lens cells of the eye. More tomorow. 

Implanting Computers in Human Brains



I heard on the news that Silicon Valley companies are planning to implant computers in human brains! Is that for real?

This topic has been discussed for some time. Interfaces have been created for individuals for several years to help them control their body movements through the brain. That may be quite different, however, than having your brain hooked directly to a computer. If you surf the Internet you will find diverging views.

https://www.businessinsider.com/eric-schmidt-elon-musk-views-on-ai-are-wrong-2018-5?r=UK

https://www.businessinsider.com/elon-musk-ai-could-turn-humans-into-endangered-species-2018-11

https://www.timesnownews.com/technology-science/article/elon-musk-exactly-wrong-on-ai-says-former-google-chief/232509

https://gadgets.ndtv.com/science/news/elon-musk-ai-threat-regulations-1725569

Air pollution and the fetal brain




My mother-in-law suggested that we move to a different city because ours has a high amount of air pollution. What could that possibly have to do with my pregnancy?

She may have read an article written by  Chia-Yi Hou and published in The Scientist. It describes studies with rodents in which researchers detected abnormal fetal development due, they believe, to air pollution. He cites data from the World Health Organization stating that 4.2 million deaths each year are related to air pollution. There are, of course, steps one can take if one lives in an area of high pollution including air filtration equipment in the home and wearing masks (e.g., N95) when going outdoors.


https://www.the-scientist.com/news-opinion/pregnant-moms-air-pollution-exposure-may-affect-babies-health-66467

Thursday, October 3, 2019

The Neuropil


Based on your blog yesterday, what in the world is the neuropil?



The neuropil is the name for the dense felt-like mass of interwoven cytoplasmic processes in which the nerve cell bodies are embedded in the central nervous system and some parts of the peripheral nervous system. The neuropil also includes the neuroglial cells (the supporting helper cells that take care of the neurons) As you may recall, neurons each have a cell body (compare this to the palm of your hand); thousands of dendrites (think of them as the fingers on your hand multiplied hundreds of times over; and usually one axon (think of this as your thumb) by which information leaves the neuron. The information is then carried across the synapse (space between the neurons) and picked up by the dendrites on another neuron. The neuropil forms the bulk of the gray matter in the central nervous system or CNS. The CNS encompasses the brain and the spinal cord.

Wednesday, October 2, 2019

M-F Neurons


I thought I heard somewhere that men have more neurons in their brain than females. Is that true?

The average male may have more neurons in the brain because the average male brain is larger than the average female brain. You may have heard a news item stemming from work by Gabrielle de Courten-Myers, MD, at the University of Cincinnati:   Men’s and women’s brains are distinctly different. While men have more neurons in the cerebral cortex (the brain’s outer layer), women have more neuropil (or neuropile), which contains the processes allowing cell communication. Neuropil is the stuff between axons, and it is fair to say that, traditionally, it has been largely ignored. Most synaptic activity in the brain occurs in neuropil.

Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Understanding the Brain


I am struggling trying to understanding my child’s brain—to say nothing of my own. Now I wonder if it’s a waste of time. Can we ever understand the brain?

I like a quote by Emerson M. Pugh:  If the human brain were so simple that we could understand it, we would be so simple that we couldn’t.” I doubt anyone will ever completely understand his or her own brain much less the brain of someone else. Remember, every brain on the planet is slightly different and unique. I keep studying because everything I do learn and can understand has been of benefit to me. Daniel G. Amen, MD, apparently has a similar perspective because he has been quoted as saying: “ I believe it benefits almost everyone to know as much as possible about how his or her own brain works.” So I keep at it!

Monday, September 30, 2019

Implanting computers in human brains




I heard on the news that Silicon Valley companies are planning to implant computers in human brains! Is that for real?

This topic has been discussed for some time. Interfaces have been created for individuals for several years to help them control their body movements through the brain. That may be quite different, however, than having your brain hooked directly to a computer. If you surf the Internet you will find diverging views.

https://www.businessinsider.com/eric-schmidt-elon-musk-views-on-ai-are-wrong-2018-5?r=UK


https://www.businessinsider.com/elon-musk-ai-could-turn-humans-into-endangered-species-2018-11

https://www.timesnownews.com/technology-science/article/elon-musk-exactly-wrong-on-ai-says-former-google-chief/232509

https://gadgets.ndtv.com/science/news/elon-musk-ai-threat-regulations-1725569

III Dangling Participles


Dangling Participles III – a grammatical faux pas

·       Walking through the woods, the trees looked magnificent.
·       Freezing our hand off, the snow was fun to play in.
·       Reading quickly, the book was too exciting to put down.
·       After laying a very large egg, the farmer presented his favorite chicken.
·       If found guilty, the lawsuit could cost billions.
·       Driving like a maniac, Joe hit a deer.
·       Caution! Pedestrians slippery when wet.
·       Looking around the yard, dandelions sprouted in every corner.

Friday, September 27, 2019

Sugar and Fruit Juices, 3


“Does the higher sugar content mean one should never drink fruit juices?”

Both the brain and body function best in balance and anything that triggers a blood sugar high can create imbalance. A small glass of orange juice while eating out for breakfast might be better than no fruit at all, but would be less beneficial than eating a whole fresh orange. Studies do point out that eating whole fruit is a better option than drinking the squeezed juice, especially when it has been filtered so no pulp or fiber is present. It is easy and fast to drink 8 or 12 ounces of fruit juice, as compared with eating the whole orange(s). The whole fruit, as compared with fruit juice, offers fewer calories from fructose and glucose and more nutrients. For those who are trying to stay within an optimum weight range, juices can be a not-easily-recognized source of extra calories.