Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Microbiome Impact


In addition to helping with digestion, your microbiome, especially the bacteria in your gut, appear to impact a range of bodily functions, from immune defenses to the production of vitamins, anti-inflammatory compounds, and even chemicals that relay messages among brain cells. Estimates are that many Americans, maybe more than 100 million, experience symptoms such as irregular bowel movements, abdominal discomfort related to gas or bloating, and sometimes constipation or diarrhea. Reportedly, 70-80 percent of your immune cells are located in your GI system and connect with and send information to the central nervous system and to other body organs. The bad news is that this is “old news,” that has not been widely disseminated or that has been forgotten or ignored. (https://www.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/ajpgi.1999.277.5.G922)

Tuesday, June 25, 2019

Microbiome and Dementia



 By now you probably already know that humans are composed of a Genome (chromosomes and genes); an Epigenome (everything that is not genetics); a Virome (all the viruses in your body, some ”good” and some “bad”); and your Microbiome (all the bacteria and other organisms in your body, some beneficial and some harmful). It is beginning to appear that the bacteria in your “gut” are way more important than previously thought. According to David Brownstein, M.D., researchers in Japan found that individuals with dementia had a very different gastrointestinal microbiome compared with dementia-free older adults. This raises questions about the role of “bad gut bacteria” not only in dementia but also with an increased risks for other conditions such as obesity, asthma, and type 1 Diabetes.

Monday, June 24, 2019

Importance of EQ


Importance of EQ

My brain’s opinion is that Emotional Intelligence is a required course for success in every aspect of life—and a next class is always available. That can be both amusing and challenging. Just when I think I’ve got a new EQ skill pretty well integrated into my life, another one pops up that I never even considered. In addition, as one researcher put it, EQ homework is challenging and the exams are often tough to pass—sometimes you have to retake the exam one or more times! Because of this, many drop out, failing to realize how high levels of EQ can be exponentially helpful in every area of life. You can do it, you know. It’s a mindset. Some have said, “I’ve done such-and-such my whole life and I don’t think I can change.” Heavens to Betsy. They may have been successful but the research is that EQ can increase one’s success. Build he skill and see how it impacts your success. In addition, you can role-model EQ to others and that may give them a leg up.

Friday, June 21, 2019

Answer for EQ Question Six


Answer for EQ Question Six

ü Enjoy the challenge and pay raise

This is a very complicated EQ decision and is predicated on “all things being equal…” If you decide to go along with the temporary involuntary transfer (for any number of reasons) then the smart decision is to avoid complaining and whining and asking “Why me?” (Why not you? You may be the best person for this job.) Marking time and waiting for the promotion may never materialize if all you are doing is marking time and waiting—that soon becomes obvious to at least some individuals. If the job market is good and you believe you can quite easily obtain another comparable job or if there is a compelling family reason that you need to consider, so be it. Whatever you would choose, however, avoid burning bridges behind you because “six degrees of separation” has been touted as falling to “three degrees of separation” (due to social media), and word can travel quickly . . .

Thursday, June 20, 2019

EQ Question Six


EQ Question Six

After an involuntary and temporary transfer to a project with a new boss in a remote area (albeit with a pay hike and a promotion possibility), you:

1. Mark time waiting for a promotion
2. Enjoy the challenge and pay raise
3.   Complain or whine and ask “Why me?”
4. Jump the gun, resign, and look for new job

Which option represents the highest level of EQ?

Wednesday, June 19, 2019

Answer for EQ Question Five


Answer for EQ Question Five

ü Evaluate their comments, accept the challenge, and learn the lingo

No one brain knows everything. Period. It is impossible! And every brain that falls within the bounds of a relatively normal brain (although I dislike the term “normal” because every brain is different and the word itself just means commonly occurring) can learn new information if he or she chooses to do so. Asking them to keep their opinions to themselves just ensures that I will have no helpful feedback to help me learn and grow (unless they ignore that request). Since I am very clear that my brain doesn’t know everything, I am very comfortable chuckling and saying something like: “Obviously, I don’t know the lingo. However, I’m very willing to learn it and will appreciate any help you can give me.” And then, whether they help me or not, I learn what the lingo means in that genre. In the process, my brain will be stimulated and challenged for the better. Ignoring another person is likely one of the most unkind and damaging things one can do to another human being because it marginalizes them. Would I ever transfer to another venue? I have done so when it became clear that “knowing the lingo” was not the issue; rather the “clique” was unopen to anyone new in the department or to me in particular. Since my brain doesn’t cotton to every brain on the planet, I accept every brain won’t cotton to mine. It is what it is.

Tuesday, June 18, 2019

EQ Question Five


EQ Question Five

When co-workers comment that you obviously are not very smart since you don’t know the lingo, you:

1     Ignore them

2     Ask them to keep their opinions to themselves

3     Transfer to another department

4     Evaluate their comments, accept the challenge, and learn the lingo

Which option represents the highest level of EQ?

Monday, June 17, 2019

Answer for EQ Question Four


Answer for EQ Question Four

ü Accept them “as is” and set your own boundaries as needed

Note: if the opinions are presented in such a way that they become a danger to others in the group, take appropriate steps to be safe. However, if it is just a different opinion, ask yourself if there is any need for you to argue or press your opinion or even express it. “I often say something like, “That’s an interesting—or different—perspective.” And let it go. Criticizing them or bad-mouthing them to others represents low levels of EQ. It rarely helps them and eventually makes you look bad as others figure “If s/he talks to me about that person the individual probably talks to others about me in a similar way!” So far, free speech is upheld in many countries—although not all. Each person, each citizen, has a right to his or her opinion and to express it—as long as it does not endanger the safety of another person or demean or put-them-down. Therefore, telling them to change in order to be accepted is likely not your job or even your right. I have sometimes observed to the newcomers privately, that since their opinions are so vastly different from those of the group they are trying to attend, they might want to consider whether the conflict is going to be worth it and if it will help them achieve what they want to achieve in the long term. If they ignore that observation and conflict continues to result, I will set my own boundaries and cease to attend the group myself. I choose to avoid placing my brain and body in an environment of conflict and dissention—because it is deleterious to my brain and body and to their health and well-being.

Friday, June 14, 2019

EQ Question Four


EQ Question Four

When newcomers with different opinions attend your group, you: 


      1.   Ignore them and hope they go away

      2.   Criticize (or “bad mouth”) them to others

      3.   Accept them “as is” and set your own boundaries as needed

      4.   Tell them to change in order to be accepted

Which option represents the highest level of EQ?

Thursday, June 13, 2019

Answer for EQ Question Three


Answer for  EQ Question Three

ü Help the person and also comment about the need to speak louder or slower or more distinctly

Laughing at a disability incident is demeaning and unkind to the person and role-models your own lack of empathy. Simply repeating the phrase so the person gets it may help that one incident but does nothing to prevent it happening again (if it is possible to prevent it). Making a comment that suggests the need to speak louder or slower or more distinctly role-models a higher level of EQ. You not only help the person in the present moment but do something to prevent similar reoccurrences in the future and that shows empathy for the person and understanding of how an inability to clearly hear something can prevent the person from participating fully or even accurately. Not everyone will choose to follow your suggestion but you have taking the higher road and some may think about it. It is important HOW you make the suggestion. You might just repeat the phrase and then say to the person: “I will make an effort to speak a little louder (or more slowly, or more distinctly).

Wednesday, June 12, 2019

EQ Question Three


EQ Question Three

When a hearing-impaired person in your group misunderstands a phrase, you:


1. Laugh with the others
2. Ignore the incident
3. Repeat the phrase so the person gets it
4. Help the person and also comment about the need to speak louder or slower or more distinctly


Which option represents the highest level of EQ?

Tuesday, June 11, 2019

Answer for EQ Question Two


Answer for EQ Question Two

ü Successful – a contented person who has what could make you happy.

This doesn’t mean that you are not striving for improvement; it means that you do not waste time in regrets or frustration. I think it was Oprah Winfrey that commented how important it is to be happy and thankful for what you have—and this attitude will get you more. If you are unhappy and discontented, you will never have enough. It’s all about mindset. Be grateful for what you have and work on improvement. Yes, life is a mixed experience, but since feelings follow thoughts, thinking ½ your life is a bust will likely overpower the ½ of your life that is good. If your perspective is that you are just a puppet, the tendency is to give up and just go with the flow (or get angry and suppress your immune system) rather than accepting that you can change some things and some you cannot. Figure out which is which and work on what you can change. A position that you deserve much better but can’t get it again concentrates on what you “don’t have” rather than taking steps, even small ones, toward improvement. It also suggests that life or someone “owes” you something and there is no law that says you are owed anything—maybe as a baby and a child¾in adulthood. Be very careful what you agree to, especially in relation to money (e.g., avoid co-signing on loans, avoid giving someone money or things and then expecting it to be repaid.)

Monday, June 10, 2019

EQ Question Two


EQ Question Two

Explain your current life in one sentence:

  1. Okay – life is a 50:50 mixed experience

  1. Successful – a contented person who has what could make you happy

  1. Comfortable – but basically feel just like a puppet in life

  1. Uncomfortable – a person who deserves better but can’t seem to get it

Which option represents the highest level of EQ?

Friday, June 7, 2019

Answer for EQ Question One


Answer for EQ Question One

ü Analyze reasons for the defeat and course correct as indicated.

Your idea may be very good but the others may not understand it and just reject it rather than show any lack of knowledge—or you may not understand the big picture the others see. Feeling totally put down and taking it personally and broadcasting how unfair you think this was helps no one—and it could even may you look bad (e.g., not a team player, unwilling to compromise, don’t know as much as you think you know...). Yes, winning and losing are part of life but if you fail to analyze reasons your idea was not accepted a good idea may die on the vine. Perhaps you need to figure out a different way of presenting it or realize that it isn’t the best option in this case after all. Waiting for the next opportunity to beat your opponents shows a very high level of competitiveness and while you may “win” in the short term you may “lose” in the long term, as too much competitiveness is likely as detrimental as no sense of competition at all. Remember, it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese.

Thursday, June 6, 2019

EQ Question One


EQ Question One

When your idea is rejected, you:

1.  Feel totally put down and tell others how completely unfair this was

2.   Analyze reasons for the defeat and course correct as indicated

3.   Figure that winning and losing are all part of the game so just let it go

4.   Wait for the next opportunity to beat your opponents

Which option represents the highest level of EQ?

Wednesday, June 5, 2019

EQ Assessment


EQ does not show up in IQ tests because it is separate from IQ¾and yet EQ matters more than anything else in determining your overall success in life both personally and professionally. Some researchers are working on developing EQ assessments that eventually may be used in hiring and evaluating personnel
Dr. Dalip Singh, PhD of India and author of Emotional Intelligence at Work is one of those researchers. He has drafted an assessment (examples of which are in his book). The few example questions that follow represent the type of questions being considered. Answer each one for yourself and figure out the reason you selected that particular response. Singh’s “answer” is included in the next blog posting. 

Tuesday, June 4, 2019

Emotional Maturity

Emotional sensitivity is like an early warning system that allowing you to pick up on potential conflict and problems before either escalates into a tornado of emotion. Emotional sensitivity help you to:

Respond appropriately to emotional stimuli of low intensity (e.g., you don’t need to be hit over the head with high intensity levels of emotion to get your attention)

Be empathetic (empathy differs from sympathy. Sympathy is the ability to care about and understand the suffering of others. Empathy goes beyond sympathy, and permits you to experience the feelings of another person at some level. Both words are often used--incorrectly as being interchangeable--but they differ subtly in their emotional meaning)

Experienced improved interpersonal relationships; you tend to  live at ‘joy’ and are not knocked down by the choices of others)

Communicate positively with positive emotion (mindset, self-talk, affirmation-style of speaking)

Monday, June 3, 2019

Emotional Sensitivity


Emotional sensitivity is like an early warning system that allowing you to pick up on potential conflict and problems before either escalates into a tornado of emotion. Emotional sensitivity help you to:

Respond appropriately to emotional stimuli of low intensity (e.g., you don’t need to be hit over the head with high intensity levels of emotion to get your attention)

Be empathetic (empathy differs from sympathy. Sympathy is the ability to care about and understand the suffering of others. Empathy goes beyond sympathy, and permits you to experience the feelings of another person at some level. Both words are often used--incorrectly as being interchangeable--but they differ subtly in their emotional meaning)

Experienced improved interpersonal relationships; you tend to      live at ‘joy’ and are not knocked down by the choices of others)

Communicate positively with positive emotion (mindset, self-talk, affirmation-style of speaking)

Friday, May 31, 2019

Emotional Competency



 Emotional Competency allows you to:

Tackle emotional upsets and avoid emotional exhaustion (no ‘stuffing it’ or building a ‘slush fund’ of unresolved emotional energy)

Possess optimum self-esteem (not under- or overinflated but balanced). You know you are valuable just because you exist and although levels of competencies exist, each person on the planet is valuable

Handle egoism (take the initiative to prevent and/or resolve conflict)

Use tactful responses to emotional stimuli (no overt response may be most appropriate at the moment)

Thursday, May 30, 2019

Dimensions of EQ


In his book Emotional Intelligence at Work, author Dahlip Singh PhD points out that EQ consists of three psychological dimensions that motivate people to maximize productivity, to manage
manage change effectively and successfully, and resolve conflict. These three dimensions are:

1.  Emotional competency
2.  Emotional maturity
3.  Emotional sensitivity

Wednesday, May 29, 2019

Event Related or Not


When you understand that your feelings are connected to what you think about an event and not by the event itself, you can gain a measure of perspective and control.

You can change your thoughts and a change in thoughts often can radically alter your feelings and your behaviors—because feelings always follow thoughts.

It is immensely empowering to realize that you are not at the mercy of your emotions and / or feelings. You can obtain the information your emotions are trying to convey and make decisions about what it anything needs to be done at the moment, without “emoting.”

Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Emotions-Feelings Cascade


There is a predictable cascade when an emotion arises and is turned into a feeling.

An internal or external stimulus triggers an emotion.

The brain tries to make sense of bodily physiological changes from the emotion

The brain makes an interpretation of what this emotion means, which results in a feeling
You become aware of a feeling—that followed
a thought

You either hang onto the feeling and exhibit a related behavior or you change the thought, which changes the feeling, and then you exhibit a different behavior

Monday, May 27, 2019

Emotionally Mature Adults, Part 2

Emotionally Mature Adults, Part 2



High EQ Behaviors:
Motivated
Contented
Connected
Calm
Interdependent
Energetic
Perceive success
Use AAA much of the time
Low EQ Behaviors:
Dejected
Angry
Lonely
Stressed Dependent
Fatigued
Perceive failure
Exhibit JOT behaviors frequently



If you are employer, who would you rather hire?
If you are an employee, who would prefer to work with?
If you are looking for romance, what do you want in a partner?




Friday, May 24, 2019

Emotionally Mature Adults


Emotionally Mature Adults

Emotionally mature adults tend to exhibit behaviors that represent high levels of EQ—most of the time:

High EQ Behaviors:
Satisfied
Aware
Balanced
Peaceful
Good self-esteem
Happy (grateful, appreciative, hopeful)

Low EQ Behaviors:
Frustrated
Unaware
Unstable
Restless
Poor self-worth

Unhappy (blaming, judgmental, critical)